Readings are of three types:

  1. Essential readings are those I always expect you to have done before class. Knowledge of the concepts in these readings will be tested in the exam and Blackboard quizzes, and will be necessary for doing the case study and other projects in the course. They are all to be found in the course notes or in the texts available in Vicbooks.
  2. Highly recommended readings will not be thoroughly tested in the exam (though questions may refer to them), but I expect you to be familiar with their content (try to skim them at least), and if you expect to get a good grade in this course and participate fully in all discussions, you will need to actually read them. Almost all of them are to be found in the course notes; those that are not can be found through e-reserves or through a direct link on Blackboard.
  3. Recommended readings will not be tested in the exam and I do not expect you to read them unless you are very interested in the topic, though I may refer to them in lectures and use them in other ways in the class. They typically provide background information or alternative theories to those discussed in the course. Students who wish to learn more about a particular topic are encouraged to read them. Recommended readings are not in the course notes, though they can be found through e-reserves or a direct link on Blackboard.

Date of lecture or deadline
Reading
Assignments due
Notes
Topics
Tuesday, March 01



Organizational
Thursday, March 03
Essential: Gandhi, Jennifer (2008). Political Institutions under Dictatorship, pp. 1-41. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Recommended: Tilly, Charles (2007). Democracy, chapter 1, pp. 1-21 (not in coursenotes). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Freedom House classification criteria (not in coursenotes). Polity codebook (not in coursenotes).
Ranking exercise on democracy (online, ungraded), web survey on definition of dictatorship (ungraded)

Definition
Tuesday, March 08
Essential: Levitsky, Steven, and Lucan Way (2002). “The Rise of Competitive Authoritarianism.” Journal of Democracy 13(2): 51-65. Highly recommended: Means, G. P. (1996). “Soft Authoritarianism in Malaysia and Singapore.” Journal of Democracy 7(4):103–117.


Regime classification, hybrid regimes, Singapore, Malaysia
Thursday, March 10
Essential: Hidalgo, Manuel (2009). “Hugo Chávez’s “Petro-socialism”.” Journal of Democracy 20(2): 78-92 (anti-Chavez). Ellner, Steve (2010). “Hugo Chavez’s First Decade in Office.” Latin American Perspectives 37(1):77–96. Recommended: Corrales, Javier (2011). “A Setback for Chavez.” Journal of Democracy 22(1): 122-136 (not in coursenotes).
Contributions to blog, wiki, or blackboard quiz due.
Mock trial of Chavez
Venezuela, regime classification, hybrid regimes
Tuesday, March 15
Essential: Bueno de Mesquita, Bruce et al. (2001) “Political Competition and Economic Growth.” Journal of Democracy 12(1): 58-72. R. Wintrobe (2001). “How to understand, and deal with dictatorship: an economist’s view.” Economics of Governance 2(1):35-58.


How do dictatorships work?
Thursday, March 17
Choose at least one: Shatz, Adam (2010). “Mubarak’s Last Breath.” London Review of Books 32(10):6-10 (not in coursenotes). Wrong, Michela (2000). “The Emperor Mobutu”. Transition 9(1): 92-112. McGregor, Richard (2010). The Party: The Secret World of China’s Communist Rulers. Harper. Chapter 1, pp. 1-33. B. Hibou and J. Hulsey (2006). “Domination & Control in Tunisia: Economic Levers for the Exercise of Authoritarian Power.” Review of African Political Economy 33(108): 185-206 (not in coursenotes). Pfaff, S. (2001). “The Limits of Coercive Surveillance: Social and Penal Control in the German Democratic Republic.” Punishment & Society 3(3):381-407. Sebestyen, Victor (2009). Revolution 1989: The Fall of the Soviet Empire. Weidenfeld and Nicolson. Chapter 16: “Let them Hate,” pp. 160-174. Havel, Vaclav (1992). “The Power of the Powerless” In Open Letters, pp. 125-153. New York: Vintage Books (not in coursenotes).


How do dictatorships work? Case studies: Mubarak (Egypt), Mobutu (Congo), CCP (China), Ben Ali (Tunisia), SED (East Germany), Ceausescu (Romania).
Tuesday, March 22
Essential: Haber, Stephen. 2006. “Authoritarian Government.” In Oxford Handbook of Political Economy, ed. B. R. Weingast and D. A. Wittman. Oxford: Oxford. University Press. Pp. 693-705. Highly recommended: Collier, Paul (2009). Wars, Guns, and Votes: Democracy in Dangerous Places. 1st ed. New York: Harper. Chapters 1 and 2, pp. 15-73.


Economic performance in dictatorships and democracies
Thursday, March 24
Essential: Verweij, Marco and Riccardo Pelizzo (2009). “Singapore: Does Authoritarianism Pay?” Journal of Democracy 20(2): 18-32. Knutsen, C. H. (2010). “Investigating the Lee thesis: how bad is democracy for Asian economies?” European Political Science Review 2(03): 451-473.
Contributions to blog, wiki, or blackboard quiz due. Vote on criteria for classifications online.

Economic performance in dictatorships and democracies, dictatorship and culture
Tuesday, March 29
Essential: Przeworski, Adam (1998). “Culture and Democracy.” In World Culture Report: Culture, Creativity, and Markets. UNESCO, pp. 125-146. Highly recommended: Inglehart, Ronald (2003). “How Solid Is Mass Support for Democracy: And How Can We Measure It?” PS: Political Science and Politics 36(1):51-57. Emmerson, Donald K. (1995). “Singapore and the “Asian Values” Debate.” Journal of Democracy 6(4): 95-105. Kausikan, Bilahari (1997). “Governance That Works.” Journal of Democracy 8(2): 24-34. Thompson, Mark R. (2001). “Whatever Happened to “Asian Values”?” Journal of Democracy 12(4): 154-165 (not in coursenotes).


Dictatorship and culture
Thursday, March 31
Essential: Mill, John Stuart (1861). Considerations on Representative Government, chapter 3, pp. 399-412. Dahl, Robert (1989). Democracy and Its Critics, chapters 4-5, pp. 52-79. New Haven: Yale University Press. Recommended: Mill, John Stuart (1861). Considerations on Representative Government, chapter 8, pp. 467-481 (not in coursenotes).


Dictatorship and knowledge
Tuesday, April 05
Essential: Acemoglu, Daron, and James Robinson (2006). Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy, chapters 1-3, pp. 1-47,51-75. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Regime change simulation
Regime change
Thursday, April 07
Recommended (not in course notes): Boix, Carles (2003). Democracy and Redistribution, Chapter 1, pp. 19-59. Ansell, B. & D. Samuels (2010). “Inequality and Democratization: A Contractarian Approach.” Comparative Political Studies 43(12):1543-1574. Houle, Christian (2009). “Inequality and Democracy: Why Inequality Harms Consolidation but Does Not Affect Democratization” World Politics 61(4): 589-622.
Classifications due via electronic form, contributions to blog, wiki, or blackboard quiz due.
Regime change simulation
Regime change
Tuesday, April 12
Essential: Valenzuela, Arturo (1989). “Chile: Origins, Consolidation, and Breakdown of a Democratic Regime.” In Diamond, Larry, Linz, Juan J. and Symour Martin Lipset, eds. Democracy in Developing Countries, vol. 4, pp. 159-206. Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder, Colorado. Pp. 159-206.


Regime change. Case studies: Chile, Argentina, South Africa
Thursday, April 14



Regime change. Case studies: Chile, Argentina, South Africa
Friday, April 15

Regime classification essay due at midnight via blackboard


Tuesday, May 03
Essential: Ash, Timothy Garton (2009) “Velvet Revolution: The Prospects.” The New York Review of Books 56(19): 1-8. Highly recommended: Goldstone, Jack A. (2001) “Toward a Fourth Generation of Revolutionary Theory.” Annual Review of Political Science 4(1): 139-187. Recommended: Geddes, Barbara (2003) “What do we know about democratization after 20 years?” Annual Review of Political Science 2(1): 115-144 (not in coursenotes).

Start reading the Sebestyen book, if you have not yet started.
Revolution and democratization, violence and revolution
Thursday, May 05
Essential: Tilly, Charles and Tarrow, Sydney (2007). Contentious Politics, chapter 1, pp. 1-23, chapter 3, pp. 45-61, 66-67. Boulder, Colorado: Paradigm Publishers.
Contributions to blog, wiki, or blackboard quiz due

Contentious politics
Tuesday, May 10
Essential: Beissinger, Mark R. (2007) “Structure and Example in Modular Political Phenomena: The Diffusion of Bulldozer/Rose/Orange/Tulip Revolutions.” Perspectives on Politics (5): 259-276. The Orange Chronicles (movie, 2007).
Progress report for case study due before class via e-mail
We’ll be watching “The Orange Chronicles” in class
Contentious politics, transnational influences on revolt. Case study: Ukraine (the Orange revolution)
Thursday, May 12
Essential: O’Donnell, Guillermo A. and Philippe C. Schmitter (1986). Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Pp. 3-36. Highly recommended: Sebestyen, Victor (2009). Revolution 1989: The Fall of the Soviet Empire. Weidenfeld and Nicolson. Pp. 1-105.


Authoritarian regime breakdown. Case studies: Eastern European communist regimes
Tuesday, May 17
Essential: O’Donnell, Guillermo A. and Philippe C. Schmitter (1986). Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Pp. 37-47. Kuran, Timur. (1991) “Now Out of Never: The Element of Surprise in the East European Revolution of 1989.” World Politics 44(1): 7-48. Karklins, Rasma, and Roger Petersen (1993). “Decision Calculus of Protesters and Regimes: Eastern Europe 1989.” The Journal of Politics 55(3): 588-614. Highly recommended: Sebestyen, Victor (2009). Revolution 1989: The Fall of the Soviet Empire. Weidenfeld and Nicolson (109-159).
Progress report for case study due before class via e-mail

Mobilization and information cascades. Case studies: Eastern European communist regimes
Thursday, May 19
Essential: O’Donnell, Guillermo A. and Philippe C. Schmitter (1986). Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Pp. 48-64. Highly recommended: Sebestyen, Victor (2009). Revolution 1989: The Fall of the Soviet Empire. Weidenfeld and Nicolson. Pp. 160-233.
Contributions to blog, wiki, or blackboard quiz due
Guest lecture by Dr. John Leslie on the fall of the GDR (East Germany)
Case study: the GDR (East Germany) and the fall of the Berlin Wall
Tuesday, May 24
Essential: O’Donnell, Guillermo A. and Philippe C. Schmitter (1986). Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Pp. 65-72. Highly recommended: Sebestyen, Victor (2009). Revolution 1989: The Fall of the Soviet Empire. Weidenfeld and Nicolson. Pp. 237-318.
Progress report for case study due before class via e-mail

Pitfalls on the road to democracy. Case studies: Eastern European Communist regimes, Venezuela
Thursday, May 26
Highly recommended: Sebestyen, Victor (2009). Revolution 1989: The Fall of the Soviet Empire. Weidenfeld and Nicolson. Pp. 318-404.


What makes for a “successful” democratic transition? Case studies: Eastern European Communist regimes
Tuesday, May 31
Essential: Ash, Timothy Garton “The Truth About Dictatorship.” The New York Review of Books 45(3).


Transitional justice
Thursday, June 02

Case study due at midnight. Final contributions to blog, wiki, or blackboard quiz due.

Review

You may also use this Google calendar: